Destroy them!

We live in an age where it does not matter what you do now.  If, twenty or thirty years ago you did something wrong, you are still condemned.  You are derided as useless, fit for the garbage heap and a hypocrite.  

Let us look how the God of the Bible handles mistakes. 

Abraham is the ancestor of the Jews.  According to the standards of our day he deserves to be denounced because he selfishly put his wife in a predicament with  foreign leaders on two occasions.  He should be dismantled and removed from his position.  Well, not if God has a say.   The Lord called him ‘Abraham my friend.’  Isaiah 41:8

#  God sent Moses to free the Israelites from slavery in Egypt.  He had fled Egypt 40 years before because he murdered an Egyptian.  In our time he would be shouted down, ‘You murderer!  Out!  We will not listen to you!’  Yet God used Moses to lead His people out of Egypt.  Moses was the leader of the Israelites for 40 years and wrote the first 5 books of the Old Testament. 

King David took the wife of one of his trusted supporters.  Later he caused her husband, Uriah, to be killed in war.  In our time he would be derided as a scoundrel and his history should be expunged from the Bible.  Yet God forgave him when he confessed his sins and said about him,  ‘I have found David, son of Jesse a man after my own heart; he will do everything I want him to do.’  Acts 13:22b  

Saul was an educated, devout Jew and Pharisee.  He made it his business to persecute, arrest and even have those who believed in Jesus, killed.  If he lived in our time, he would surely be shouted down as, ‘Persecutor of Christians!  Unfit to live!  Traitor!’  Yet God stopped him in his madness, made him the apostle Paul and gave him back some of his own medicine.  God personally taught him the hidden treasures of His Gospel plan.  Paul wrote 13 of the letters to congregations in the New Testament.   

#  Jesus warned His disciple, Peter, that he would betray Him three times during the Lord’s trial.  Peter did exactly that.  If he lived today, people would denounce him and ‘send him straight to hell.’   What did Jesus do?  He gave Peter the opportunity to repeat three times that he loved him.  The Lord Jesus told Peter, ‘Feed my sheep.…  Follow me!’  John 21:15-29 

Maybe we should learn from God.  We live in a world where people search for the ‘dirty laundry’ of others and parade it for all to see.  Who cares if that person changed?  As long as he can be humiliated and degraded (tear down his monument).  Who cares that Jesus teaches mercy and said, ‘Do not judge, or you too will be judged.’  Matthew 7:1  

The lesson

We will all appear before God to give an account of what we did while on earth.  That means all people, not just some.  Maybe it is wise to leave judgement to God. 

Mr Donald Trump’s unpardonable sin. Part 2

It is interesting to watch the efforts to dredge up as much dirt as possible on Mr Trump.  What about his ‘sins’ of the past?  Before judging too fast, let us look at the life of David, the king of Israel.  David united the nation, made Jerusalem the capital and successfully waged war against their enemies. 

Then he committed a grave sin: 

  • He seduced the wife of one of his trusted soldiers.  She became pregnant. 
  • He tried to cover it up.  He had her husband come home from the army to visit her.  When that failed, he organised it that her husband was killed. 1

#  If there ever was a case for impeachment and jail, it was that. 

Watergate and other ‘scandals’ are nothing compared to David’s offences.  Look at the tragedies in his family: 

  • His son Amnon raped his half sister Tamar and ruined her life. 2
  • His son Absalom killed Amnon, fled, came back, conspired against his father and organised a coup.  Absalom was killed in the hostilities that followed. 3
  • Then, nearing the end of his life, his son Adonijah tried to usurp the kingship.  God had chosen Solomon, the son of David and Bathsheba, Uriah’s wife, to be the next king (the grace and mercy of God!). 4
  • Beside that, David made a strategic blunder when he counted the nation.  It cost the nation 70,000 that died. 5

#  Talk about the failures of a king. 

  • Yet, listen to what God says about him, ‘I have found David son of Jesse a man after my own heart; he will do everything I want him to do.’ 6 
  • How did that come about, and what was it God wanted David to do?  God sent His prophet, Nathan, to confront David about his sin.  David repented. 7

#  Then David began with a work which we believe God intended for him. 

  • He began the preparations to build the temple.  He did not build it, because God chose his son, Solomon, to do it. 8 
  • Yet David organised the Levites, the division of the priests, the singers, the gatekeepers. 9
  • He got the plans for the temple from God. 10
  • He collected massive amounts of gold, silver, bronze, wood and whatever was needed. 11  He also encouraged the leaders to contribute.  No wonder God recommended David’s efforts on behalf of the temple, God’s House where He would put His Name and live among the Israelites.  

Conclusion

David is a vivid proof of how a person can be an instrument in God’s hands, even if he is far from perfect.  The reason is that Jesus died for our sins, so there is forgiveness if we confess them and turn away from them.  King David is an example of how God takes a terrible mistake and turns it around.  That applies to all people, even to Mr Trump.

References

  1. 2 Samuel 11  
  2. 2 Samuel 13  
  3. 2 Samuel 14-15, 17-18  
  4. 1 Kings 1  
  5. 2 Samuel 24  
  6. Acts 13:22  
  7. 2 Samuel 12; Psalm 32, Psalm 51  
  8. 1 Chronicles 22  
  9. 1 Chronicles 23-26  
  10. 1 Chronicles 28  
  11. 1 Chronicles 29

David, failure or man after God’s own heart

It is never too late! Don’t let people tag you. Allow God the last word over your life.

Sometimes we put a tag on a person.  For example we talk about one of Jesus’ disciples as ‘doubting Thomas’ because he doubted Jesus’ resurrection.1  Yet we forget that he was also brave and committed to His Master.  When the chief priests wanted to kill Jesus, on the occasion of going to raise Lazarus, Thomas said to the other disciples, ‘Let us also go, that we may die with Him.’ 2  Why is he not recommended for his fearlessness?

#  We often treat King David the same way and give him a tag.

People remember him as an adulterer and murderer in the case of Bathsheba.  Turmoil in the family was a problem for David: one of his sons raped a sister and was killed by a brother.  That brother later tried to push his father from the throne and make himself king, but was killed.  Another son also tried to elevate himself to kingship and was killed.  Shouldn’t David be tagged ‘Failure?’

#  Did the omniscient God tag David ‘Failure?’

  • No!  The New Testament reports, “He [God] testified concerning him, ‘I have found David son of Jesse a man after my own heart; he will do everything I want him to do.'” 3
  • Look at what David did after all his mishaps (he confessed his sins 4).  He turned his attention to that which God held dear in His heart: His Temple.  That is where God would live in the midst of His people.
  • David, not allowed by God to build the temple, said, ‘My son Solomon is young and inexperienced, and the house to be built for the Lord should be of great magnificence and fame and splendor in the sight of all the nations.  Therefore I will make preparations for it.’ 5

#  David’s exhaustive preparations

  • He brought the ark to Jerusalem. 6
  • He organized the Levites, priests, singers and gatekeepers. 7
  • He got the plans for the temple from the Holy Spirit. 8
  • He gathered immense amounts of gold, silver and bronze and got the leaders to contribute. 9

#  What is the moral of the story?

God was very pleased with David’s life work, done near the end of his career.  So when we think we blew it, God says it is not over yet.  If we confess our sins, God will reveal the next stage of His plan for each of us individually.  That might result in God giving us the wonderful tag, ‘A man (or woman) after my own heart who did what I wanted him or her to do.’

Conclusion

It is never too late!  Don’t let people tag you.  Allow God the last word over your life.

References

  1. John 20:24-29
  2. John 11:16
  3. Acts 13:22
  4. Psalm 32:1-5; Psalm 51
  5. 1 Chronicles 22:5
  6. 1 Chronicles 15-16
  7. 1Chronicles 23,24,25,26
  8. 1Chronicles 28
  9. 1 Chronicles 29
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